Species Spotlight

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In this section we will high light a specific invasive specie that will be rotated out regularly.

Species we spot lighted in prior months are stored on another web page for your viewing throughout the year.

Prior Spot Lighted Species

seperator

CURRENT SPOT LIGHT

Name: Chinese Tallow Tree (Triadica sebifera)*tallow tree

Type: Deciduous tree

Description: A small to medium-sized tree with a crooked trunk 12" to 18" in diameter and a height to 50 feet at maturity.

YES!!! We do have many Chinese Tallow Trees around the lake, up stream and down stream of Canyon Lake. Eradication of the tree is difficult, but if you follow expert advice, it can be removed from your propert to prevent spreading and blocking lake access and the veiw of the lake.

Range/Site Description: Native of Japan and China, tallowtree is now found in yards, pastures, fencerows, and other unmaintained areas throught coastal and southeast Texas. Tolerates all soil conditions, but not cold-hardy in North or West Texas.

Leaf: Simple, alternate, 2" to 4" long, generally triangular, with a wedge-shaped leaf base and a long, pointed tip; leaf edge smooth. Fall color varies from yellow, orange, red, and purple, sometimes on the same tree.

tallow flower

 

Flower: A long, yellow spike of flowers, 8" to 10" long, appearing after the leaves in the spring.

 

 

tallow seed

Seed Pod : Dark gray, 0.5" diameter, three-parted seed clusters open to reveal white, popcorn-likewaxy seeds in late fall or winter. Birds eat and spread the seeds. Not for human consumption!

 

Bark: Tan and bumpy when young, developing flattened ridges that flake outward on older trunks to give a slightly shaggy appearance.

Wood: Wood is weak and soft, decays easily. Seeds can be harvested for the waxy coating to make soaps and fuel oil.

Similar Species: Native shrub coralbean (Erythrina herbacea) has similar leaves, but fruit is a pod. Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) occurs only in the highest mountains of West Texas.

History: First introduced to the Gulf coast by the USDA in the 1900's to develop a soap-making industry from the seeds.

To see more pictures of the tree, go to Google and type in Chinese Talloww. Then click Enter. You will find hundreds of pictures and how destructive it is to local environments. It is beautiful in the fall when changing colors, but the seeds can travel along distance in water and start new growth any place the seed stops. Please do not plant the tree, and try to eliminate it if you find it on your property. If it is on Corps property, call us and we will take a look and varify.

*All informaton pulled from following location on the Texas A&M website http://texastreeid.tamu.edu/content/TreeDetails/?id=115

TPWD Link

 

Invasive Species Information

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There are many plant, animals and insects that qualify as an invasive specie. Any living organism that is moved from one ecosystem to a completely foreign ecosystem is an invasive specie. Most of the invasive species are very destructive to the new habitat and can kill off local plants, animals and insects.

To keep the lands and water around Canyon Lake pristine we need to work together to prevent the movement of the invasive species into the area. Report any and all potential sightings to our lake office and Texas Parks and Wildlife ASAP so we can verify the specie and help keep them out. Below are some links to helpful web sites.

Topic
Description
Link
Insects
Info on why moving fire wood can cause the spread of invasive insects.
All Species
Info on what an invasive specie is and how to prevent their spread.
Vegetation
How to manage nuisance aquatic plants
Giant Salvinia information and how to report sightings
All Species
A simple guide on protecting the native plants and animals in your area
All Species
Simple guide on the basics of invasive species

If you know of a good web site that educates and teaches about invasive species, please send us the link.

We will then post it here to share with everyone.

Invasive Species Table

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Invasive Species Table

There are many invasive plants and animals that could cause potential harm to Canyon Lake if they entered the ecosystem. A few land plant species are known to be here around the lake. There are no known aquatic plants or animals invading Canyon Lake currently. The links below will provide guidance on what types of plants and animals and how to deal with them on personal property if they should appear. If the lake ever has an outbreak of these plants, we will manage it through your help and with TPWD.

The list below is only a small portion of the species that can cause harm. Use the links above to learn about more species. Click on the links to see details and pictures of each specie. They either take you to a University or the USDA. If a link is broken, let us know so we can reconnect you with the knowledge base.

Type
Habitat
Common Names
Scientific Name
Links
Plant
Aquatic
Giant Salvinia
Salvinia molesta
Plant
Aquatic
Hydrilla
Hydrilla verticillata
Plant
Aquatic
Water Hyacinth
Eichhornia crassipes

Link 1

Plant
Aquatic
Eurasian Watermilfoil
Myriophyllum spicatum L.
Plant
Aquatic

Alligator Weed

Alternanthera philoxeroides
Plant
Aquatic
Water Lettuce
Pistia stratiotes L.
Plant

Terrestrial

Bastard cabbage

Rapistrum rugosum
Plant
Terrestrial

Malta star-thistle

Centaurea melitensis
Plant
Terrestrial

Tree of heaven

Ailanthus altissima
Plant
Terrestrial

Chinaberry tree

Melia azedarach
Plant
Terrestrial

Chinese tallow tree

Triadica sebifera
Animal
Aquatic
Zebra Mussel Dreissena Polymorpha
Animal
Aquatic

Armored Catfishes

Hypostomus plecostomus
Animal
Aquatic
Grass Carp Ctenopharyngodon idella
Animal
Aquatic
Bighead Carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis
Animal
Aquatic
Black Carp Mylopharyngodon piceus
Animal
Aquatic
Northern Snakehead Fish Channa argus
Animal
Terrestrial

Feral Pig

Sus scrofa
Animal
Terrestrial

European Starling

Sturnus vulgaris
Animal
Terrestrial

Brown Tree Snake

Boiga irregularis
Animal
Terrestrial/Aquatic
Nutira Myocastor coypus
             
Mollusc
Terrestrial
Giant African Snail Lissachatina fulica
Mollusc
Aquatic

Island Applesnail

Pomacea insularum
Mollusc
Aquatic
Giant Ramshell Snail Marisa cornuarietis

Mollusc
Aquatic
Red-rim Melania Melanoides tuberculatus
             
Insect
To be added later
Link 1
Link 2
Link 3